The Devourers by Indra Das

The Devourers Cover

The Devourers by Indra Das engages on many levels and resists easy definition. You might read several different synopses of The Devourers and wonder if the reviewers hadn’t mistakenly read different novels; there’s good reason for this—Das’s novel is intricate, unpredictable, and complex. Layers of narrative peel back like an onion, drawing you deeper and deeper into the heart of the story through several compelling voices, both male and female, human and werewolf. But even to call this a werewolf novel isn’t quite right, because although the word is used, the shape-shifters here have been called different names by different cultures over the millennia. They are fierce creatures, like the werewolf, but have remarkable additional powers and a certain dignified arrogance. They consider themselves gods among men. The novel itself spans several epochs, relayed in part through the text of ancient scrolls, and with a voice that is engaging, powerful, and relatable. The strength of The Devourers is derived not only from these compelling relationships and intriguing plot, but from the novel’s ingenuity and unpredictability. The story carries you through a breathtaking scope of time, land, and culture, from the Mughal Empire to modern Kolkata. The casual beauty of the prose will leave you unprepared for its sudden brutality and horror. The hearts and passions of the characters are fully realized and pleasantly surprising. It’s a story of transformation and love, but the love is bestial and terrifying in its nature.

The Devourers Cover

The Devourers by Indra Das

About author

Gunnar Norskog / Gunnar Norskog

Gunnar Norskog writes speculative fiction, science fiction, fantasy, horror, and steampunk. He is a member of Clarion West, Class of 2016.

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